Read on line
Listen on line
Main > Fairy tale > All authors > Andrew Lang > Fairy tale "The Black Thief and Knight of the Glen"

The Black Thief and Knight of the Glen

`I had not gone far,' continued the Thief of Sloan, `until I saw a grey- hound, a hare, and a hawk in pursuit of me, and began to think it must be the witches that had taken the shapes in order that I might not escape them unseen either by land or water. Seeing they did not appear in any formidable shape, I was more than once resolved to attack them, thinking that with my broad sword I could easily destroy them. But considering again that it was perhaps still in their power to become alive again, I gave over the attempt and climbed with difficulty up a tree, bringing my sword in my hand and all the gold along with me. However, when they came to the tree they found what I had done, and making further use of their hellish art, one of them was changed into a smith's anvil and another into a piece of iron, of which the third soon made a hatchet. Having the hatchet made, she fell to cutting down the tree, and in the course of an hour it began to shake with me. At length it began to bend, and I found that one or two blows at the most would put it down. I then began to think that my death was inevitable, considering that those who were capable of doing so much would soon end my life; but just as she had the stroke drawn that would terminate my fate, the cock crew, and the witches disappeared, having resumed their natural shapes for fear of being known, and I got safe off with my bags of gold.

`Now, sir,' says he to the Knight of the Glen, `if that be not as great an adventure as ever you heard, to be within one blow of a hatchet of my end, and that blow even drawn, and after all to escape, I leave it to yourself.'

`Well, I cannot say but it is very extraordinary,' says the Knight of the Glen, `and on that account pardon this young man his crime; so stir up the fire, till I boil this second one.'

`Indeed,' says the Black Thief, `I would fain think he would not die this time either.'

`How so?' says the knight; `it is impossible for him to escape.'

`I escaped death more wonderfully myself,' says the Thief of Sloan, `than if you had him ready to throw into the furnace, and I hope it will be the case with him likewise.

Also read
Read
Read
Read
Ameen and the Ghool
Category: Arabic folktales
Read times: 33