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Main > Russia folktales > Fairy tale "Sila Tsarevich and Ivashka with the White Smock"

Sila Tsarevich and Ivashka with the White Smock

When they had gone half-way, Ivashka told Sila Tsarevich to halt and pitch his tent. So Sila obeyed, and ordered the tent to be put up. The next day Ivashka laid pieces of wood in front of Sila’s tent and set fire to them. Then he led Queen Truda out of the tent, unsheathed his sword, and cut her in twain. Sila Tsarevich shuddered with terror and began to weep; but Ivashka said: “Weep not, she will come to life again.” And presently all sorts of evil things came forth from the body, and Ivashka threw them all into the fire. Then he said to Sila Tsarevich: “See you not the evil spirits which troubled your wife? She is now relieved from them.” And, so saying, he laid the parts of Truda’s body together, sprinkled them with the water of life, and the Queen was instantly sound and whole as before. Then said Ivashka: “Now, farewell, Sila Tsarevich, you will find that your wife loves you truly, but you will never see me more.” And so saying he vanished.

Sila Tsarevich ordered the tent to be struck, and journeyed on to his native country. And when he came to the place where his ship was waiting for him, he went on board with the fair Queen Truda, dismissed the escort which accompanied him, and set sail. And on arriving at his own kingdom, he was welcomed with salvos of cannon, and Tsar Chotei came out of his palace and took him and the beautiful Queen Truda by their lily-white hands, led them into the marble halls, placed them at table, and they feasted and made merry. Sila Tsarevich lived with his father two years; then he returned to the kingdom of King Salom, received from him the crown, and ruled over the country with his Queen Truda in great love and happiness.

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