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Main > Fairy tale > All authors > Frank Baum > Fairy tale "Aunt Jane's Nieces"

Aunt Jane's Nieces

"

"It was very wicked of you," said Patsy, soberly, from her father's

lap.

"As it turned out," continued the little man, "Jane's desire to leave

her money to her nieces amounted to nothing, for the money wasn't

hers. But I must say it was kind of her to put me down for five

thousand dollars--now, wasn't it?"

The Major grinned.

"And that's the whole story, my friends. After Jane's death you

offered me a home--the best you had to give--and I accepted it. I had

to come to New York anyway, you know, for Isham, Marvin & Co. have

been my bankers for years, and there was considerable business to

transact with them. I think that's all, isn't it?"

"Then this house is yours?" said Patsy, wonderingly.

"No, my dear; the whole block belongs to you and here's the deed for

it," drawing a package of papers from his pocket. "It's a very good

property, Patsy, and the rents you get from the other five flats will

be a fortune in themselves."

For a time the three sat in silence. Then the girl whispered, softly:

"Why are you so good to me, Uncle John?"

"Just because I like you, Patsy, and you are my niece."

"And the other nieces?"

"Well, I don't mean they shall wait for my death to be made happy,"

answered Uncle John. "Here's a paper that gives to Louise's mother the

use of a hundred thousand dollars, as long as she lives. After that

Louise will have the money to do as she pleases with."

"How fine!" cried Patsy, clapping her hands joyfully.

"And here's another paper that gives Professor De Graf the use of

another hundred thousand. Beth is to have it when he dies. She's a

sensible girl, and will take good care of it."

"Indeed she will!" said Patsy.

"And now," said Uncle John, "I want to know if I can keep my little

room in your apartments, Patsy; or if you'd prefer me to find another

boarding place."

"Your home is here as long as you live, Uncle John. I never meant to

part with you, when I thought you poor, and I'll not desert you now

that I know you're rich."

"Well said, Patsy!

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